LET THE MUSIC PLAY…….

Ok.. who can name the singer of this blog title? Of course, it is the incomparable Barry White!  So, why have I chosen to write about a 70’s Love God? Well, it’s more about the part that music and lyrics play in our learning of new skills in both business and life. From creating memories, to taking us back to past times, to providing the backdrop to our lives; music can have a significant part to play.

Certain songs have the ability to transport me to specific times and places and relive a moment in glorious technicolour detail. I cannot hear a brass band without being jettisoned back to my childhood and the memory of my Grandad playing the big bass drum with the Langley Prize Band outside our house every Christmas Eve. I am a blubbering wreck at the sight and sound of a trombone or cornet!

As a designer of learning events, my challenge is to create multi-sensory environments to appeal to all participants’ learning preferences. Using visual tools/cues and physical movement are a few ways I can achieve a rich learning tapestry for attendees, but could using music help or hinder a learner’s experience?

There is certainly a weighty body of evidence which demonstrates that music can have a positive impact in education and treatment of illnesses such as Dementia. Music has been found to light up parts of the brain like a firework display and reconnect people to memories and abilities that may have been thought lost. Studies have demonstrated that music enhances the memory of dementia patients, and has shown that scores on memory tests improved when they listened to classical music. Chris Brewer, founder of LifeSounds Educational Services and author of the book Soundtracks for Learning, explains that music can help to hold our attention, evoke emotions, and stimulate visual images. “Students of all ages—that includes adults— generally find that music helps them focus more clearly on the task at hand and puts them in a better mood for learning,” says Brewer.

Many of the research studies suggest that playing music when engaged in a learning activity has an impact on “positive mood management” and that various styles of music are appropriate for different types of activities. For example, upbeat popular music to motivate learning, especially songs with lyrics that encourage positive thinking. However, when engaged in more reflective learning such as writing, or reading, instrumental music can help to sustain concentration. Classical music of the Baroque era, such as Vivaldi, Handel, Bach with musical pulses between 50 to 80 beats per minute helps to stabilise mental, physical and emotional rhythms. Music has been found to affect the neuro plasticity of the brain and slower baroques can create mentally stimulating environments for creativity and new innovations.

The case is certainly strong for incorporating music into a learning event, however perhaps a word of caution before facilitators and trainers rush to build their playlists into sessions. Tests on retention and transfer of knowledge and skills have also shown that irrelevant background music can lead to poorer student performance and can create a distraction for learners if it generates a negative emotional reaction. Just as we would with any piece of design work, if we intend to use music in our sessions, then we need to think about the needs of the audience and choose music that resonates rather than alienates and most importantly seek permission from the learners before launching our chosen tracks.

As I prepare to head to Edinburgh for a week of self-development, I am starting to think about my musical choices. As I do my evening homework, I want to create neural pathways that help me in the future to access the resources I have developed during the day – so to that end I am most definitely going to “Let the Music Play!”

If you would like to find out more about any of our development programmes please contact us at hello@change-gear.com or call us on 07714 793669 we’d love to chat with you and maybe even hear about your favourite learning tunes.

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