Hot Topic

DEMYSTIFYING GDPR

Like many businesses, the hot topic in the Change Gear office is how do we ensure compliance with the new data protection regulations.  Making sense of what we need to do has not been easy, however we have been fortunate to benefit from the wise counsel of Katie Renwick – a valued member of the Change Gear team. In this blog Katie shares her advice for small businesses as they take action and get ready for the looming deadline of May 25th.

As a small business, understanding exactly how a new piece of legislation will impact on us and our clients, can be quite challenging.  Being able to understand the legislation itself, as well as sifting through what can sometimes feel like ‘Doomsday Declarations’ from industry commentators to get to the heart of what it really means, can take time and energy you may not have planned to spend.   There have been some big hitters recently in new legislation for larger businesses; Gender Pay Gap reporting and the Apprenticeship Levy, for example, while for smaller businesses there has not been much significant change since the Living Wage was introduced.

The General Data Protection Regulations 2018, GDPR, comes into force from 25th May.  In a nutshell, the regulations increase the levels of accountability for businesses to demonstrate they handle data in a professional, transparent and, most importantly, an agreed way.  It is a necessary update to the 1998 legislation, as the world we now live in thrives on data which is available across a range of digital platforms as well as the traditional files and papers.  The increased occurrence of identity theft on an individual and mass level as well as an increase in social media targeted marketing, often without knowledge or consent, has prompted the EU to introduce this legislation.  It is an attempt to tighten the rules and improve the options for the individual to choose what can, and cannot, be done with their data.

So how do we gain the understanding about GDPR and, in reality, what will it change for me and my business?  The great news is that the Information Commissioner’s Office, ICO, has provided a number of easy to access infoguides explaining what the legislation is on their website, www.ico.org.uk.  Their approach is to engage with businesses and the public to create confidence and dispel the myths and fear of the unknown that inevitably accompanies such a change.  They emphasise that the principles are based largely upon the legislation that we have been working within, the Data Protection Act from 1998. In recognition of the different impact this legislation may have on different size businesses they plan to issue a specific guide for SME businesses which will be more relevant for those of us who do not have an internal legal, HR or Finance department to provide the right level of guidance..

While the information on the ICO website helps explain what the legislation is, there is a gap in terms of understanding what needs to be doneUtilising an expert to help identify the risks and opportunities that this legislation presents is key.  Within a relatively short period of time you should be able to identify where change is needed as well as the practical steps, processes and policies needed to put the change into place.

In terms of what it will change for your business there are a number of key considerations:

  • What data do I have?
  • How do I store, access and share that data?
  • Do I share the data outside of my business with third parties and where are they based?
  • How will I obtain consent going forward and how will I meet the individual rights obligations?
  • How will I handle data breaches and reporting should it happen?
  • What training do I need to provide to the team and how will I test understanding?

A core aim of the legislation is to limit unscrupulous activity, such as the alleged, illegal data harvesting and sharing from Facebook to Cambridge Analytica and beyond, it is not designed to limit our ability to market our business services or support our clients. It is an opportunity to review how we do things, cleanse our systems and consider how we communicate, particularly when using email, going forward. With that in mind, we may be in touch more often asking you to confirm you’re happy to keep hearing from us.

To support our clients we have created a practical GDPR pack, available as templates to tailor inhouse or with expert, consultancy support to assess how the change will impact you and your business.

Contact us at hello@change-gear.com or call us on 07714 793669 for an informal chat as to how we can best help your business.

“WHO DID WHAT TO WHOM?” THE LOST ART OF STORYTELLING

In its simplest form storytelling is a connection of cause and effect. A narrative helps us make sense of the world around us. In fact, our informal conversations are dominated by stories; researcher Jeremy Hsu found 65% of our conversations are made up of personal stories and gossip – “who did what to whom?

Great stories surprise us; they have the ability to spark emotions, whether it’s happiness, anger, trust or guilt. They have compelling characters. They make us think and make us feel. They stick in our minds and help us remember ideas and concepts in a way that numbers and text on a slide with a bar graph don’t.  Fundamentally our brains are more engaged when listening to stories and studies show that when information is communicated in this way people will better relate to and remember it.

Story telling has been used successfully in brand advertising for years.  Guinness has come up with some great marketing stories such as their “Empty Chair” ad where a bartender leaves a pint of Guinness at an empty table every night.  No one sits at the table, and the woman shoots a dirty look to anyone she catches eyeing one of the empty chairs.  Without fail, the Guinness is there every night. It’s a powerful image that serves as a sign of hope for the bartender. But we aren’t exactly sure who the beer is for until the very end. Everything comes together when a soldier finally returns home to claim his Guinness.

Lego’s “Let’s Build” ad is another great example of storytelling in advertising. The ad features a father and son bonding over their Lego; it shows the two of them creating fantastic skyscrapers with their enormous Lego collection. For a second you forget that it’s advertising toys because all you see is the perfect home life parents and kids are always dreaming of. And so a story unfolds.

Although storytelling is a timeless human tradition, unfortunately it has become a lost art in many businesses. Instead of taking the time to craft captivating stories, most people in business create dreary Powerpoint presentations; you could say Powerpoint has killed our ability to tell good stories, and this is a habit we need to change.

However, a word of warning! – storytelling works on a spectrum – at one end you have BIG stories – like legends, epics and fairytales – at the other end you have small stories such as examples, recounts and anecdotes.  When starting out in storytelling it’s best not to try too hard – start small with your stories until you get more confident.  And try to build a bank of stories – funnily enough they don’t always pop in your head when you need them.  In the meantime here are a few of our top tips to help you on your way:

 Surprise your audience

When you set out to create your story, it’s always good to start by revealing an important fact or detail that isn’t common knowledge or includes an unexpected turn of events. Try to hook your audience by sharing something that no one would expect because when it comes to storytelling, predictable plots won’t engage anyone.

Get to the point

Although you need to hook people in, it is also really important to get stuck into your messaging as quickly as you can. Stick to relevant details if you want people to listen to your entire story, as most people don’t have the patience or the time to hang around! Choose two or three main points that people will actually care about and focus on those — things like money saved, number of users, growth over the years are all effective examples.

Think about your purpose

What’s the point of your story? Are you informing or teaching your audience, are you trying to sell them something or are you just engaging with them to make them feel inspired to act? Make sure you have a single message that you want them to take from your story.

Be honest

Everyone makes mistakes or does embarrassing things every now and then, but being honest about those less than perfect moments will make you and your message easier to relate to. Share those painful lessons you learned. Even the simplest things like a spelling mistake in a text can show your human side.

Overcome the odds

Talk about a few of the challenges you have overcome, such as rejection or setbacks. Tell your audience what you learned from each challenge, how it motivated you and inspired you to get better.

Don’t forget humour

Using humour will engage your audience and make your story more likely to be remembered and shared. Laugh at yourself or a situation you found yourself in, never at someone else. But do run it by a few friends or colleagues first, just to make sure it is actually funny as well as appropriate.

And finally … Hold something back

As well as the tips above about being honest and open, you shouldn’t reveal everything all at once. Keep people interested and wanting to come back for more by finishing on a cliff-hanger. Make sure all your content can stand alone but getting your audience to think you have something more that they need to hear will keep them hooked.

And on that note, I invite you to join us at our free breakfast seminar “Powerful Persuasion – The Art of Storytelling” on Tuesday 20th March at CitizenM Hotel, Tower Bridge, where the Change-Gear team will share with you their secrets on how to finesse this age-old skill.

To book your ticket please follow this link: ART OF STORYTELLING BREAKFAST SEMINAR

We look forward to seeing you there.

 

OUT WITH THE OLD IN WITH NEW – (REALLY!!!)

It’s that time of year again where most of us are thinking about shaking off the past 12 months and setting ourselves up for a great one to follow.  I am most certainly guilty of an unashamed enthusiasm in January for any new regime and feeling positive that “this is going to be the year where I actually stick to the healthy eating and fitness regime, get more sleep, read more, do a digital detox etc. etc.” You know the drill.

So as the 1st of January came upon me, I sat down to write my goals in my new journal and started to think about what might make this a really different year for me.  Having unexpectedly lost someone very close to me at the end of last month I wasn’t sure whether I wanted to close the door on the year completely – or have it a little ajar to keep the memory of them alive for me.  That then got me thinking that perhaps the “new broom sweeps clean” mentality may not necessarily always be the best one.  Perhaps it is about holding on to what’s good from our pasts, letting go of what’s held us back and making space for learning how to improve what we need to, not what we feel we have to.

I started to think about a conversation I’d had with a friend at the weekend.  When I asked her whether she had any resolutions for 2018 she said “to drink less water” – I thought she was crazy until she added on “from plastic bottles”.  I immediately wanted to steal it.  I’m sure many of you have been watching David Attenborough’s Blue Planet II – as well as continuing to show us the beauty of the natural world it comes with an urgent message which we can no longer afford to ignore – the cost of global warming and pollution.  The programme raises a critical awareness of the immediate threats facing our oceans and underscores how much humans and the planet stand to lose if we fail to recognise and acknowledge the negative impact we are having on them.  It’s not a new message for us – but it’s such an important one.

Moving on to the plastic plague that is upon us, Greenpeace recently revealed that Coca-Cola unbelievably increased its production of throwaway plastic bottles last year by well over a billion. (As if you needed another good reason to stop buying fizzy drinks!).  Extreme environmentalists are urging companies to stop selling drinks in plastic bottles altogether whereas the more pragmatic are suggesting we make it easier for customers to use fewer plastic bottles.  A firm favourite of the Change Gear team is forward thinking Pret a Manger.  Pret have been fighting the “waste” battle for many years.  30 years ago, they started donating their unsold food to the homeless and today their initiatives include offering customers a 25p discount on hot drinks if they bring in a reusable cup. At the end of last year Pret introduced a trial in their three Veggie Pret shops selling reusable glass bottles alongside plastic bottles with filtered water stations enabling customers to refill their glass bottles.

Elsewhere, London’s Borough Market is to introduce free drinking water fountains as part of a new pledge to phase out sales of all single-use plastic bottles over the next six months. Selfridges stopped the sale of single-use plastic water bottles back in 2015.

The issue is gaining traction in the political sphere, with Defra Secretary Michael Gove confirming he will work with businesses to see how a drinks container deposit return scheme could work in England. Similar schemes have proved highly successful in Scandinavian countries such as Denmark, where recycling rates of containers are now above 90%.

My friend’s resolution was whirring round in my head.  When I got home I emptied my recycle bin to take a good hard look at what was in there – I was horrified by the amount of plastic bottles and food tubs I found.  I knew this was going to be my more important mantra for the year ahead – Use less plastic.  So how do you turn the mantra into action.  As usual making things a habit so that they stick (thank you Gretchen Rubin for your insights here) is a must.  Here are a few simple things I will be doing:

  • Carrying a reusable water bottle wherever I go
  • Taking my own coffee cup
  • Bringing reusable shopping bags to the supermarket
  • Carrying a fold up reusable shopping bag or two in my handbag at all times
  • Getting rid of all reusable cutlery and straws from my kitchen
  • Buying my fruit and veg from our local shop to avoid supermarket plastic trays

And of course, encouraging my friends and family to do the same.

I would love to hear from any of you out there reading this blog on your thoughts on the subject or to hear what you are personally doing to take action to help save our planet.  Let’s share this message urgently.

In the meantime, I wish you all a very happy, healthy and renewable 2018.

Hot Topic – Are we doing enough to support young people joining the workplace?

Our new “Hot Topic” posts look at what is currently trending either nationally and/or globally, allowing us to share with you our unique Change Gear point of view. In our first “Hot Topic” Carrie shares her thoughts about how employers can do more to support young people entering the workplace – a very real hot topic for everyone waiting for their A-Level and GCSE results to be unveiled!

As a mother, whose son is about to get his long awaited A Level results today, this question is certainly one that has catapulted to the front of my mind recently. Having been very clear that university was the way forward for him, a sudden last minute change of heart (high expectations and the thought of being saddled with a huge debt from university fees) had him announce that he was going to get a job instead.  I’m all about encouraging my children to make good decisions and choices and do what makes them happy but knowing the employment arena as I do, this new revelation has made me a tiny bit anxious on his behalf.

Recent research is suggesting that as much as 80% of young people finishing education feel they are not being taught the right skills before they leave to help them successfully find work.  So it’s no surprise that today over 900,000 people aged between 16-24 are unemployed in the UK.  The ratio of youth unemployment is far higher than adult unemployment and this gap does not seem to be decreasing.

Yet in order for organisations to future proof themselves against a back drop of an ageing workforce where knowledge transfer is critical they are going to have to start actively promoting the recruitment of young talent into the workplace.  There are so many positive reasons for businesses to employ young people; it’s certainly more cost effective to invest in your own young talent rather than buy in more expensive, skilled people later.  It also adds to workplace diversity – young people bring with them different perspectives, fresher ways of looking at things and usually their technical and digital knowledge far outweighs that of older generations.  It’s also a fantastic way to boost the PR of your business.

So how can your business help transition young people from education to work?  Here are Change-Gear’s 5 top tips to help you on your way:

  • Start to form relationships with your local schools and colleges to bridge the gap between your business and education. Careers offices are always keen to meet employers.  Offer to run workshops or taster sessions for them giving young people information and advice about what a career in your industry would be like. Share your stories and expertise with them.

 

  • The Apprenticeship Levy has forced many employers with an annual pay bill of over £3 million to think differently about hiring apprentices into their workforce. Faced with spending 0.5% of their total pay bill they are keen to make sure they use their £15,000 allowance each year by taking on apprentices into their businesses and providing on the job training and coaching using this allowance.  Whether the levy applies to your business or not, offering apprenticeship schemes is a great way of attracting young talent into your business.  Many bright students are opting for an apprenticeship programme as opposed to facing huge uni fees, so you are likely to get some great young recruits.

 

  • Provide high quality work experience opportunities giving young people the insight and skills they need to work in your industry. This can also be a great way to “try before you buy”.  Plan out the work experience so that the student really comes away with something useful and a good impression of your organisation.  Do remember you are as much on show as a business as they are!  Social media will make sure the message about how good or bad their experience was will spread wide and far!

 

  • Question whether you definitely need someone with previous “work experience”. We often make assumptions that taking on a young person straight from education will be a lot of hard work for us and time consuming “showing them the ropes”.  How many times have you hired someone who didn’t have enthusiasm and energy (even in their first few months) and you ended up spending far more time dealing with their lack of motivation and commitment?  Often young people are really keen to show what they can do and work exceptionally hard to prove themselves.

 

  • Consider whether the recruitment processes in your business actually are “youth friendly”. Think about your own interview questions and whether you adapt your interview style to bring out the best in them during the interview process.  This may well be a first interview for a first job – so make sure you are giving them the right environment to relax and be the best they can be.

 

So hopefully that’s given you some food for thought and if you’d like to learn more about how we help our clients with induction programmes for apprentices and graduates or some of the one to one work our coaches do with young people looking for work, please get in touch.  In the meantime, here’s wishing all the students getting their results tomorrow the best of luck.

This content is blocked. Accept cookies to view the content.